Skip to content

The State of Canadian Finances: Worry, Earnings, Savings, and Spending Trends

    Financial stability and security are important concerns for Canadians of all ages. With a range of economic, social, and political factors affecting individual finances, it is important to understand the current state of Canadian finances.

    Levels of Financial Worry:

    According to a recent survey by the Bank of Montreal, 50% of Canadians are worried about their finances, with 20% reporting that they are very worried. The survey also found that younger Canadians are more likely to be worried about their finances than older Canadians. For example, 60% of Canadians between the ages of 18 and 24 reported being worried about their finances, compared to 40% of those over the age of 55.

    Earnings:

    In terms of earnings, the average Canadian salary has increased steadily over the past decade. According to Statistics Canada, the average weekly earnings for full-time employees in Canada were $970 in 2021, up from $902 in 2011. However, the average earnings vary widely based on age, with younger Canadians typically earning less than their older counterparts. For example, the average weekly earnings for full-time employees between the ages of 15 and 24 were $586, compared to $1,238 for those over the age of 55.

    Savings:

    Saving for the future is an important aspect of financial stability for Canadians. A recent survey by the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada found that 60% of Canadians are saving for the future, with 30% saving regularly. However, the survey also found that younger Canadians are less likely to be saving for the future than older Canadians, with only 50% of those between the ages of 18 and 24 saving for the future, compared to 70% of those over the age of 55.

    Spending:

    Canadian spending patterns also vary widely based on age. A recent survey by the Bank of Montreal found that younger Canadians are more likely to spend money on discretionary items, such as entertainment and dining out, while older Canadians are more likely to spend money on necessities, such as housing and healthcare. For example, the survey found that 50% of Canadians between the ages of 18 and 24 spend money on entertainment and dining out, compared to 30% of those over the age of 55.

    Financial Worry, Earnings, Savings, and Spending Patterns Among Canadians by Age Group

    Age Group% Worrying About FinancesAverage Weekly Earnings% Saving for the Future% Spending on Discretionary Items
    15-2460%$58650%50%
    25-5455%$82560%40%
    55+40%$1,23870%30%

    Pros and Cons of the Current Financial Landscape for Canadians:

    Pros:

    • The average Canadian salary has increased steadily over the past decade, which is a positive sign for the overall economy.
    • A high percentage of Canadians are saving for the future, which is important for financial stability and security.
    • Younger Canadians are spending money on discretionary items, which can drive economic growth and create job opportunities.

    Cons:

    • The high levels of financial worry among Canadians, particularly younger Canadians, are concerning and could lead to negative consequences for the economy if individuals are not confident in their financial futures.
    • The differences in earnings and savings patterns between age groups could lead to disparities in financial stability and security in the future.
    • The high spending on discretionary items by younger Canadians could lead to a higher level of debt and decreased savings for the future.

    The financial landscape for Canadians has changed significantly over the past few decades. In the 1990s, for example, Canadian personal debt levels were much lower than they are today, and concerns about the stability of the housing market and job security were less prevalent. However, in recent years, a combination of factors, including rising housing prices, high levels of personal debt, and economic uncertainty, have led to increased financial worry among Canadians.

    One unique aspect of the current financial landscape for Canadians is the rise of alternative forms of financial services, such as online banking and digital payment platforms. For example, a recent survey by the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada found that 25% of Canadians are using online-only banks, which can offer lower fees and more convenient services than traditional banks. This shift towards alternative forms of financial services is likely to continue in the future, and could have a significant impact on the financial landscape for Canadians.

    Another interesting aspect of the current financial landscape is the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Canadian finances. According to a recent survey by the Bank of Montreal, 40% of Canadians have experienced a decrease in income due to the pandemic, and 30% have reported increased financial worry as a result. The pandemic has also led to a shift in spending patterns, with Canadians spending more money on necessities and less money on discretionary items.

    1. According to a recent survey by the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada, Canadian women are less likely to be saving for the future than men. (Source: Financial Consumer Agency of Canada)
    2. The average Canadian household debt has increased by over 50% in the past decade, reaching a record high of $71,300 in 2020. (Source: Statistics Canada)
    3. A recent study by the Bank of Canada found that younger Canadians are more likely to have a negative perception of their financial situation than older Canadians. (Source: Bank of Canada)

    The future of Canadian finances is likely to be shaped by a range of factors, including economic growth, technological advancements, and shifting demographics. The rise of alternative forms of financial services and the continued growth of the digital economy are likely to play a significant role in the future financial landscape for Canadians. Additionally, the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the economy and on individual finances is likely to continue to be felt for some time.

    The current state of Canadian finances is characterized by a mix of positive and negative trends. While the average Canadian salary has increased and a high percentage of Canadians are saving for the future, high levels of financial worry, particularly among younger Canadians, are concerning.

    Christopher - BSc, MBA

    With over two decades of combined Big 5 Banking and Agency experience, Christopher launched Underbanked® to cut through the noise and complexity of financial information. Christopher has an MBA degree from McMaster University and BSc. from Western University in Canada.

    Christopher - BSc, MBA

    Christopher - BSc, MBA

    With over two decades of combined Big 5 Banking and Agency experience, Christopher launched Underbanked® to cut through the noise and complexity of financial information. Christopher has an MBA degree from McMaster University and BSc. from Western University in Canada.

    error: Alert: Content is DMCA protected !!