Skip to content

When to Cash Out of your RRSP?

    An RRSP (Registered Retirement Savings Plan) is a savings plan for retirement that is registered with the Canadian government. RRSPs offer tax benefits to incentivize Canadians to save for retirement, and are a popular investment vehicle for many. Withdrawing money from an RRSP account can have significant tax implications, so it’s important to understand when it’s the right time to cash out of an RRSP.

    Best Time to Withdraw Money from an RRSP:

    According to a report by the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada (FCAC), the best time to withdraw money from an RRSP is generally when you’re in a lower tax bracket, as the amount you’ll need to pay in taxes will be lower. Additionally, you may want to consider withdrawing money from your RRSP when you’re planning to use the funds for a specific purpose, such as a down payment on a home or to pay for education expenses.

    In order to understand the best time to withdraw money from an RRSP, let’s consider the following table, which shows the tax implications of withdrawing money from an RRSP at different income levels:

    Income LevelTax BracketTax Implications
    $0 – $45,00015%15% of the withdrawn amount
    $45,000 – $90,00022%22% of the withdrawn amount
    $90,000 +26%26% of the withdrawn amount

    Let’s consider an example to see the tax implications of withdrawing money from an RRSP. If you withdraw $10,000 from your RRSP when your income level is $50,000, the amount of taxes you’ll need to pay is 22% of the withdrawn amount, which is $2,200. On the other hand, if you withdraw the same amount from your RRSP when your income level is $40,000, the amount of taxes you’ll need to pay is 15% of the withdrawn amount, which is $1,500.

    RRSPs were first introduced in 1957 as a way to encourage Canadians to save for retirement. Over the years, the RRSP program has undergone several changes, including changes to contribution limits, tax benefits, and eligibility criteria. In the early days of the RRSP program, the main focus was to provide tax benefits to Canadians, however, over the years, the program has evolved to include a wide range of investment options, including mutual funds, stocks, bonds, and exchange-traded funds (ETFs).

    In recent years, the Canadian government has introduced several new programs to encourage Canadians to save for retirement, including the Tax-Free Savings Account (TFSA) and the Pooled Registered Pension Plan (PRPP). These programs offer alternative options for Canadians looking to save for retirement, and can be used in conjunction with an RRSP to provide a comprehensive retirement savings strategy.

    Let’s consider a few real-world examples to see how withdrawing money from an RRSP can impact your finances.

    • Example 1: You’re planning to buy a home, and you need to come up with a down payment. If you have $25,000 saved in your RRSP, you can withdraw the funds to use as a down payment, but you’ll need to pay taxes on the amount you withdraw. Depending on your income level, this could mean paying anywhere from 15% to 26% in taxes on the withdrawn amount.
    • Example 2: You want to pay for your children’s education expenses. If you have saved $20,000 in your RRSP, you can withdraw the funds to pay for tuition and other education-related expenses. Again, you’ll need to pay taxes on the withdrawn amount, which will depend on your income level.

    Pros:

    There are several advantages to withdrawing money from an RRSP, including:

    • Flexibility: RRSPs are a flexible savings vehicle, and you can withdraw funds at any time for any reason, subject to paying taxes on the withdrawn amount.
    • Tax Benefits: Withdrawing money from an RRSP when you’re in a lower tax bracket can help minimize the amount of taxes you’ll need to pay on the withdrawn amount.
    • Access to Funds: Withdrawing money from an RRSP provides you with access to funds that you can use for a wide range of purposes, including paying for a down payment on a home, paying for education expenses, or covering other unexpected expenses.

    Cons:

    While there are several advantages to withdrawing money from an RRSP, there are also several disadvantages to consider, including:

    • Taxes: Withdrawing money from an RRSP means that you’ll need to pay taxes on the withdrawn amount, which could be substantial depending on your income level.
    • Loss of Investment Growth: Withdrawing money from an RRSP means that you’ll be losing out on potential investment growth, which could impact your retirement savings in the long run.
    • Reduced Retirement Savings: Withdrawing money from an RRSP reduces the amount you have saved for retirement, which could impact your retirement income in the future.

    The best time to withdraw money from an RRSP depends on a variety of factors, including your income level, tax bracket, and the purpose for which you need the funds. Withdrawing money from an RRSP can have significant tax implications, so it’s important to understand the pros and cons before making a decision. If you’re considering withdrawing money from your RRSP, it’s recommended that you speak with a financial advisor to understand the best course of action for your specific situation.

    Christopher - BSc, MBA

    With over two decades of combined Big 5 Banking and Agency experience, Christopher launched Underbanked® to cut through the noise and complexity of financial information. Christopher has an MBA degree from McMaster University and BSc. from Western University in Canada.

    Christopher - BSc, MBA

    Christopher - BSc, MBA

    With over two decades of combined Big 5 Banking and Agency experience, Christopher launched Underbanked® to cut through the noise and complexity of financial information. Christopher has an MBA degree from McMaster University and BSc. from Western University in Canada.

    error: Alert: Content is DMCA protected !!