How to Contact Laurentian Bank Customer Service?

  • 2 min read

Laurentian Bank customer service is open 24/7 to accept your comments or resolve any concerns that you may have. The primary customer service line is 1 (800) 252-1846. An alternative number for local customers is (514) 252-1846. You will be given several options to reach a specific department.

  • Lost and stolen credit cards is Option 1.
  • Investment support is Option 2.
  • Financing support is Option 3.
  • VISA customer service is Option 4.
  • General support is Option 5.

If you prefer to avoid the these options, report a lost or stolen VISA card at 1 (800) 263-8980 or (514) 284-7570 to have immediate support. TTY customers may contact Laurentian Bank customer service at 1 (866) 262-2231.

For customers who do not wish to speak with a representative, but do wish to provide specific feedback about their experiences, a separate line has been setup for you. Call 1 (877) 803-3731 or (514) 284-3987.

If you need to reach the Ombudsman for Laurentian bank, call 1 (800) 479-1244.

Account holders may also contact customer service via email through the Laurentian Bank website. Separate email forms are available to resolve issues with personal or commercial banking products and services. There is also a non-secure email form for suggestions or website comments.

If you prefer direct mail, then send any comments or complaints to the following address:

Customer Inquiries
555 Chabanel Street West, 5th floor.
Montreal, Quebec H2N 2H8

You may also receive local customer service at the branch nearest to you. The closest branch can be found with the helpful Laurentian Bank find a branch locator service.

Getting the customer service you need is easy with Laurentian Bank. Use your preferred contact method listed above to resolve the issues you are having and you will find satisfaction.

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Christopher - BSc, MBA

With over two decades of combined Big 5 Banking and Agency experience, Christopher launched Underbanked® to cut through the noise and complexity of financial information. Christopher has an MBA degree from McMaster University and BSc. from Western University in Canada.